Cookies for Kids’ Cancer Blog

Denny’s LOVES Good Cookies!

Filed under: Uncategorized — The Good Cookies @ 5:00 am July 16, 2014

Denny’s across the US help raise funds for Cookies for Kids’ Cancer this July.

Since 2011, select Denny’s in Arizona and New York have held an annual month-long campaign to raise funds for Cookies for Kids’ Cancer. This year we are pleased to welcome Denny’s stores back! Throughout the month of July, nearly 100 stores in 13 states are joining the cause and hosting events to help children battling cancer!

Participating Stores

Below is a complete list of all Denny’s stores participating in the June campaign.

How it Works:

DSCN5838In exchange for a donation of their choice, customers will be offered paper cookies, where they can write their name or personal message. The cookie will then be added to the collection displayed throughout the restaurant. Every dollar raised will go to research for childhood cancer, the number one disease killer of children in the U.S.

To date, the AZ and NY Denny’s have raised $250,000 for Cookies for Kids’ Cancer. This year, with the increased support, customers could help more than DOUBLE that total amount in July alone! Stop by a participating Denny’s near you for a bite and help make a difference for children fighting cancer.

 

                      Arizona

 

 

 

New York

City

Address

Amherst 3920 Maple Rd.
Auburn 176 Grant Ave.
Batavia 364 W. Main St.
Buffalo 2215 Delaware Ave.
Buffalo 4445 Main St.
Camillus 5300 W. Genesee St.
Canandaigua 160 Eastern Blvd.
Cheektowaga 4610 Genesee St.
Cicero 7873 Brewerton Rd
Corfu 8484 Allegheny Rd
Depew 4757 Transit Rd
Fairport 4 Perinton Hills Mall
Fredonia 10390 Bennett Rd
Geneseo 4240 Lakeville Rd
Geneva 813 Canandaigua Rd
Hamburg 5092 Camp Rd
Horseheads 950 Chemung St
Lockport 5699 Transit Rd
Niagara Falls 8020 Niagara Falls
North Syracuse 201 Lawrence Rd
Orchard Park 3165 Southwestern Blvd.
Painted Post 118 Victory Hwy
Rochester 2890 W Ridge Rd
Rochester 911 Jefferson Rd
Syracuse 6591 Thompson Rd
Syracuse 103 Elwood Davis Rd
Syracuse 3414 Erie Blvd.
Victor 7503 Main Street Fisher
Watertown 1142 Arsenal St
West Seneca 1881 Ridge Rd

 

 

Guest post by Denise Mickelsen

Filed under: Uncategorized — The Good Cookies @ 9:34 am June 6, 2014

Denise M familyOver the past eight years, I have known profound loss—family members with cancer, multiple miscarriages, and then, just a few months after giving birth to my son, Sam, the stunning news that I carry the BRCA2 gene mutation (the “breast cancer gene”), which meant that it was highly likely I would develop aggressive breast and/or ovarian cancer. The positive test results took my breath away, like a punch in the gut. My Aunt Laura died from ovarian cancer when she was just 42, leaving my 9- and 3-year-old cousins motherless. After everything I went through to have Sam, I couldn’t bear the thought of us being separated like that.

It’s not easy to be a new mother in your 30s and consider a bilateral mastectomy and hysterectomy to avoid cancers you don’t have, but I had to face it. There was no way I was going to let cancer take me from my son without a fight. I had no choice. So I had both surgeries, and it was worth it if I get to watch Sam grow up, get married, and give me grandkids to spoil.

But what if those happy years that I envision with Sam were taken from me because he got cancer? That question ran on an endless loop in my head last October, when my cousin Emily’s 1-year-old daughter, Emma, was diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML5a); she almost died before the doctors figured out what was wrong.  Then in February, my high school friend Andy found out that his 4-year-old son, Ben, had stage IV glioblastoma, an incredibly aggressive brain tumor. (You may have heard of Ben Sauer–his mother, Mindy, shares his story and their family’s experience with cancer through an incredibly moving blog, Blue4Ben.com.)

Despite all I’d been through during those terribly difficult years, nothing hit me harder than the suffering of these two young children.
I couldn’t handle it. I felt such grief, such pain and sympathy for Emma and Ben, their parents and families. And I couldn’t stop thinking about how my feelings were a mere fraction of what they were feeling. The horrors of watching a beloved child suffer from cancer and its harsh treatments, and not being able to do anything about it. What could be worse?

Doing nothing.

When I realized that I actually could do something, it made all the difference. I could do exactly what Gretchen Holt Witt did when her son, Liam, was sick – host a bake sale – and in a very real way help kids like Ben and Emma. For the first time in months, I felt a glimmer of hope. Crying and grieving and worrying couldn’t make Emma or Ben better, and it couldn’t bring Liam back. It couldn’t take away their parents’ pain either, but dammit, I could bake cookies! And I could ask everyone I knew to bake even more cookies, donate money, or help however they could. So, I began planning my first Cookies for Kids’ Cancer bake sale.

As I worked on the sale, I learned about the dire underfunding of pediatric cancer research—just 3 cents of every dollar for cancer research in the U.S. goes to funding treatments for children?! How can that be? There are far too many mommies and daddies, grandparents, aunts and uncles and cousins out there who love a child with cancer for that statistic to be true. Clearly, people just don’t know, which means that we’ve all got to do our part to spread the word. For Emma Shaffer. For Ben Sauer. For every single boy and girl who deserves to grow up, get married, and give their parents grandkids to spoil.

I’m happy and relieved that Emma endured her chemo and has been cancer-free for three months now; she turned two on April 18th and is back home with Emily and Mike. But little Ben died on May 13th (Liam’s birthday), and Andy and Mindy have to live with that loss every day.

The only thing that has been able to pull me out of my sadness and worry for the Sauers has been working to make my first Cookies for Kids’ Cancer bake sale a success. We’ve already raised more than $4,500, and it’s inspiring to see how the desire to help is contagious. It’s like wildfire – once people hear about Emma and Ben, and the unjust and unequal funding for pediatric cancer research, they want to join the fight. So even though I hope we raise tons of money to help fund new treatments, it’s also just as important that we spread the Cookies for Kids’ Cancer message so others will be moved to help, too.

The worst thing we can do is nothing. The best thing we can do is channel our loss into something positive — a bake sale, a 5K race, a penny drive — that will help these kids and give their families hope. That will make all the difference!

Busting Childhood Cancer Myths

Filed under: Uncategorized — The Good Cookies @ 10:31 am February 1, 2014

Pediatric cancer myths present enormous barriers to researchers receiving the funding they need. Over the next week, help us bust these myths. Go social using the hashtags #KidsCancerMyths and #WorldCancerDay and get others involved in the conversation.

MYTH: Pediatric cancer is rare and doesn’t impact many people.

FACT: Cancer is the #1 cause of death by disease of children in the U.S. – More than asthma, diabetes, cystic fibrosis and AIDS combined.

On any given day, there are 40,000 children in the U.S. alone actively battling cancer. And incidence rates are rising. As of now, one in 300 children in the U.S. will be diagnosed with cancer before they are 20-years-old.

Nick and Zach, two teens in California, can tell you firsthand that pediatric cancers are not as rare as is often thought. Read their inspiring story.

 

Kick Summer Boredom

Filed under: Bake Sale,Good Cookies,Inspire,Uncategorized — The Good Cookies @ 10:31 am July 9, 2013

While the first weeks of summer fly by with vacations, camps and days at the pool, there comes a point where activities to keep the kids entertained aren’t easy to find. But with these five ways to kick summer boredom, your family can keep busy and give back at the same time.

1. Switch Up the Menu

Summer is a great time to get creative with recipes, especially since colorful refreshing fruit like watermelon is in season.

The opportunities for summer treats are endless. Like these easy-to-make watermelon “cookies,” sure to be a hit at any bake sale. Get more summer recipe ideas by following Cookies for Kids’ Cancer on Pinterest.

Share your favorite summer event ideas with us on Twitter and Facebook too!

2. Bring in the Troops

Planning a Cookies for Kids’ Cancer fundraiser with a Girl Scout troop is a great way for the group to have fun, bond and get involved with the community.

Additionally, any Girl Scout troop that holds a bake sale or other fundraising event will receive special Cookies for Kids’ Cancer patches for their support.

Ask about getting a troop involved today!

3. Have a Car Wash

On a hot summer day, nothing feels better than splashing in the water. Next time you’re thinking about heading to the pool or turning on the sprinklers, hold a car wash instead.

Not only will the kids enjoy decorating signs and posters, but they’ll have fun in the water, all while raising much-needed funds for pediatric cancer research.

Sign up to host an event today!

4. Start a New Tradition

Follow the lead of these Good Cookies in the Hamptons, who just held their FOURTH annual 4th of July bake sale for Cookies for Kids’ Cancer. Independence Day may be over, but Labor Day will be here before you know it.

National Kids’ Day and Founders’ Day are in August as well. Think about some holidays or occasions coming up this summer and celebrate by starting a new Good Cookie tradition.

5. Involve Local Businesses

Good Cookies host events in all shapes and sizes, and no effort is too small to make a difference. If you find yourself with time to spare or could use something already planned to raise funds, take advantage of the opportunity.

Many businesses offer discounted prices for charity fundraisers, and will even donate items for your event. Organize a percentage night at a local burger hang-out or ice cream shop. Turn a birthday party at the bowling alley into fundraiser. Every dollar counts.

A Letter from Gretchen Holt-Witt

Filed under: Inspire,Uncategorized — The Good Cookies @ 11:11 am May 13, 2013

Liam Witt would have turned 9 today. In honor of his birthday, his mom Gretchen has written a special letter to all the Good Cookies who help us do what Liam would have done: fight to make things better for kids everywhere.

A few days ago I went to Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, the place where my son Liam was treated for Neuroblastoma…and the place where he took his last breath.

It’s as hard as it is easy for me to go there. I know it inside and out. I know where things are. I know the people. I know the routines.  I know the smells. I know how to read the looks on the faces I see…some have fear, some have joy, some determination and some are just lost. I know them all, because at one time or another I had one of those looks on my face, which I always tried to hide from Liam so that all he saw was love.

I was at the hospital delivering favorite snacks to a shy, 12-year old boy from Oklahoma who has been in the hospital getting ready for a bone marrow transplant, and nail polish remover and cotton swabs to his mom. Chemo makes everything taste weird, so finding foods that a child wants to eat as they try to figure out what tastes good is a never-ending process. One day one thing tastes good, the next it doesn’t. Parents frantically search for anything that tastes good…anything…just to get precious calories into their child. It was a struggle Liam’s dad and I dealt with almost every day.

The family I was visiting came to NYC for routine scans as follow up to being treated for Neuroblastoma. Their son successfully battled back from his initial diagnosis, and then subsequent relapses, which, unfortunately, is pretty common in the world of nasty Neuroblastoma. It’s one of those types of cancers that likes to come back, again and again.

Their soft-spoken son had been cancer-free for a few years when, during the scans, they found that he had developed what’s known as “secondary Leukemia,” a type of cancer caused by the toxic chemotherapy he received for his initial diagnosis. Isn’t that the ultimate irony – the drugs used to treat his cancer caused another type of cancer, which is only treatable with a bone marrow transplant. This is the type of cancer Robin Roberts from Good Morning America recently battled.

They had packed enough clothes for a 3-day trip for those scans, but discovered they’re now going to be in NYC for 5 months. He was admitted immediately to start the rigorous process of a stem cell transplant.

Hospital time drags on….it’s awful and sucks the life out of you. 5 minutes can seem like 5 hours as you wait and wait and wait. When I dropped off the supplies, the boy’s mother was so grateful. It was the first time we were meeting, and yet we instantly knew each other. She wanted to sit in the small kitchen area on the pediatric floor designated for families and talk. I sat in the very same orange chair Liam sat in so many times. She told me she has to leave to go back to Oklahoma on Saturday for two weeks to complete nursing school. If she doesn’t go back now, she’ll need to start nursing school all over again. She is switching spots with her husband, who had just arrived to relieve her. They also have a 14-year old son who is back in Oklahoma. The emotional toll cancer treatment has on a family is one that is so hard and yet very rarely told.

While I was walking up to the pediatric floor, I walked through Nuclear Medicine and had a hug fest with the head of the department, the assistant manager, and several of the technicians. Several had come to Liam’s memorial service. We all cried together and told stories of Liam playing his blue guitar in the hallway with a small, empty box of Cheerios in front of him ready to take donations.

We reminisced how he would serve water to everyone in the waiting room, anxiously awaiting their name to be called out to go to a scanning machine that would reveal the state of their cancer. No one ever said no to Liam’s hospitality. I couldn’t believe how vivid their stories were of him. We all miss him and everyone marveled at how Liam’s sister, Ella, has grown so big.

And then I stopped in to radiology. It was a radiologist who found Liam’s first relapse, which was so small it didn’t appear on the sensitive nuclear medicine scan but showed up on a CT scan. We all thought it was nothing. It turned out it was something.

I saw people from Liam’s beloved cafeteria, where he was heralded as the next great chef. They would give him a chef’s hat and apron and take him into the kitchen to see how French Fries were made. I think the reason so many people were touched by Liam is because he took a genuine interest in them, and in what they were doing. And by doing so, showed how much he cared. It was beautiful to watch.

When I was leaving, I ran into Dr. Kim Kramer, who was one of Liam’s doctors on the Neuroblastoma team, and is now focusing her efforts on brain cancers. We hugged. We remembered. She told me that the project funded by a $100,000 grant recently provided by Cookies for Kids’ Cancer is now a treatment children are receiving for a horribly aggressive type of pediatric brain cancer called DIPG. It was a project that was considered risky but when given the choice between an option and no option, any option seems like a good option. And in the world of pediatric cancer which claims the lives of more children than any other disease, so many times you just want to know there is an option.

The fourth child just received the treatment and so far, all children are doing well. Can you believe that? Seriously, think about it…the money YOU raised helped fund this treatment that kids are receiving TODAY; Kids who, without this treatment, have very few if any options.

For your past efforts and your current efforts, we thank you from the bottom of our hearts. Words alone can’t express our gratitude. We promise you, your efforts are working and they are making a difference in the lives of children battling today and will help those diagnosed tomorrow. And we can’t tell you how grateful we are that you continue to be part of this journey.

Thank you for Loving Like our Sweet Liam who would be celebrating his 9th birthday today.

To our sweet boy, we will continue to do what you would want us to do and make it better for others. As you taught us, “If not now, when?”

Happy Birthday. We love you.

Mommy, Daddy and Ella

Meet Stefanie Scott, Official Good Cookie Ambassador

Filed under: Uncategorized — The Good Cookies @ 12:22 pm March 4, 2013

Stefanie Scott, Official Good Cookie Ambassador

vatchephoto.com

Hi Everyone!  My name is Stefanie Scott. You may know me as Lexi on the Disney Channel show, A.N.T. Farm! I’ve always loved to bake – especially chocolate chip cookies for my brother.

So, when I heard about Cookies for Kids’ Cancer, I had to get involved. Right now, more than 40,000 kids across the country are battling cancer. And I want to do my part to raise awareness and funds to help give each of those kids hope for a bright tomorrow.

I know that kids and teens want to make a difference, and with Cookies for Kids’ Cancer, it’s easy and fun. One of the things I love about Cookies for Kids’ Cancer is they offer ways to support the cause that anyone can do!

The most important part – Being a Good Cookie. What does that mean? It means that you find a way to help raise money for pediatric cancer research that works for you. I like to bake, so a bake sale makes sense for me. But kids across the country are getting involved in lots of ways. Some are running 5k races – others are organizing entire 5ks in honor of Cookies for Kids’ Cancer. From kickball tournaments to penny drives…No matter how you do it, BEING a Good Cookie makes a difference.

That’s why I want to do everything I can to help Cookies for Kids’ Cancer spread the word, and to show people my age that there is something we can do. I’m asking you to join me in becoming a member of the Good Cookie Club. Gather friends, family, classmates and neighbors, and host an event at your school, church or local business. Together we can, AND WE WILL, make a difference in the fight against pediatric cancer.

Corporate Good Cookies Share the Love this February

Filed under: Bake Sale,Inspire,Uncategorized — The Good Cookies @ 12:24 pm January 15, 2013

As we approach Valentine’s Day, we have a very special goal: To have at least one bake sale in every state during the month of February.

Valentine’s Day was Liam’s favorite day. To honor him and children everywhere battling cancer, we’re asking Good Cookies from coast to coast to “Love like Liam” and host an event this February. $100,000 is all it takes to get a research project off the ground. Imagine what could be accomplished if the entire country rallied together for the ultimate bake sale.

And this Valentine’s Day, we have special support from our newest corporate partner with Italian glassware company Bormioli Rocco. To sweeten the launch of this new relationship and in the spirit of Valentine’s Day, Bormioli Rocco is matching every dollar raised, up to $25,000, at February Cookies for Kids’ Cancer events!

Bormioli Rocco is giving more than a match. The FIRST 100 Good Cookies to register a February event will receive a 4-piece set of Bormioli Rocco Quattro Stagioni Jars, complete with a gift kit. We LOVE these classic canning jars. They’re perfect for filling with dry ingredients and giving as ready-to-make recipe gifts.

Up for a Challenge? Breville and OXO are giving two very delectable reasons to aim high this February. The TOP 10 fundraisers of the month will each receive a Breville Smart Oven AND an OXO Cookie Press, complete with 12 design plates for any occasion!

Register your February event today!

Bormioli Rocco Inspires Retailers to Support Nationwide Bake Sale

Filed under: Uncategorized — The Good Cookies @ 9:00 am January 4, 2013

In 2007, Larry and Gretchen Witt’s son Liam was diagnosed with cancer. It was then that they learned the primary reason pediatric cancer remains the number one disease killer of children is the lack of effective treatments, and that is due to one thing: a lack of funding. So, they decided to find a way to raise the funds so desperately needed for research. By 2008, Cookies for Kids’ Cancer was founded.

Liam Witt was full of love. In fact, Valentine’s Day was his favorite day of the year, because a day celebrating love just made sense to him. Liam was six years old when he lost his battle with cancer in January 2011. To honor him and the love he exuded, his parents postponed his memorial until Valentine’s Day, where the message was clear: Love. Like. Liam.

As we approach Valentine’s Day, and the second anniversary of Liam’s memorial, we have a very special goal: Inspire supporters to host at least one bake sale in every single state during the month of February.

All it takes to get a pediatric cancer research project off the ground is $100,000. Imagine what could be accomplished if the entire country rallied together for an Ultimate Bake Sale, and how many lives could be saved by treatments developed from the research funded by these grants.

Senior Staff at Bormioli Rocco have supported Cookies from the beginning, but this year, they are invested in an entirely new way. To help reach our goal of bake sales in every stateduring February, Bormioli Rocco has committed to match all funds raised at bake sales in February, up to $25,000, and is asking retailers nationwide to host bake sales. Cookies for Kids’ Cancer will even provide a complimentary bake sale supply kit to retailers that register to host a February event.

Register today!

ABOUT BORMIOLI ROCCO

Bormioli Rocco, founded in 1825 in Italy, is a pioneer in the domestic and catering glass sector that has grown from a single entity into a group of business and multinational production units.  With widespread presence across the retail and foodservice channels, Bormioli Rocco has an extensive range, from wine glasses to barware, dinnerware and serve ware and a variety of products in food storage and canning.

Be Glad to Give—Host a Holiday Bake Sale or Cookie Exchange

Filed under: Uncategorized — The Good Cookies @ 9:25 am November 28, 2012

Make every cookie count this holiday season thanks to Glad! Glad is giving $1 per cookie sold or swapped, up to $100,000.  Register here to host an event! To host a cookie exchange, simply follow these steps:

1.  Make a guest list and ask each guest to bring four dozen cookies to swap, plus copies of their recipe. Plan for a fun evening with friends by offering hot cider to go along with the cookies.

2. Swap your cookies! At the event, set out all the cookies on one large table. Ask the guests to gather round the table and then, walking clockwise, select one cookie from each plate on the table the first time around, then two cookies from each plate the second time. Keep going until all the cookies are gone. Where should your guests collect their cookies? That’s easy – Gladware.

3.  Count cookies! Before everyone leaves the cookie swap, find out the total number of cookies from each guest. Once you have a number, simply e-mail by December 30th with the tally and watch as you and your friends help increase funding to pediatric cancer research.

And the fun doesn’t end there. To make your cookie swap a fundraiser, simply ask guests to make a donation to Cookies for Kids’ Cancer. It’s just another way to give hope this holiday. Then, hop online and send virtual cookies to friends and family through Glad’s Mom Made website and Glad will make another donation to Cookies. Visit their website and send your cookies today! The more cookies you send, the more Glad donates!

Let’s all be Glad to Give this holiday season—Host a Bake Sale or Cookie Exchange and help bring HOPE to children battling pediatric cancer.

Meet Dr. Kim Kramer

Filed under: Uncategorized — The Good Cookies @ 9:50 am November 20, 2012

Dr. Kim Kramer serves on the Cookies for Kids’ Cancer medical advisory board and is an Associate Member of the Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Department at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, one of Cookies for Kids’ Cancer five partner centers. Below Dr. Kramer discusses the need for funding pediatric cancer research.

“Sometimes the raw facts are too painful to acknowledge: there are some kinds of cancers for which no improvements in treatment or survival has ever been made. This is true for some childhood brain tumors, like brain stem tumors, that are always fatal. That means hundreds of children are diagnosed, and hundreds of children die, year after year, decade after decade, for over 30 years. Science doesn’t move forward without one critical element: support.

When Cookies for Kids Cancer accepted our proposal to pioneer a new type of treatment for such an illness, we sensed a glimmer of hope for these young children. Could the natural history of such a devastating illness finally be changed? This glimmer of hope is visible because amazing foundations like Cookies understand and care.”

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